Video prototyping

Video prototyping is a simple way to show new and speculative designs, ideas, scenarios, futures or products. Showing a video gives you a clear idea of how users might perceive a concept that might be difficult to prototype otherwise.

Video prototyping

1 DAY - 2 WEEKS

back

TASKS

1. Select a concept to prototype, Split the concept into steps that need to be shown and explained.
2. Write a script that clearly explains all the steps of the solution and how they work within the desired context.
3. Create a storyboard based on the script.
4. Organize everything that is needed to proceed for filming (actors, cameras, permits, etc.)
5. Film according to your plan and schedule.
6. Develop special graphics and/or special effects if needed.
7. Edit all the clips into a consistent story and render it.
8. Recruit and gather potential users of the design, show them the video.
9. Collect notes and feedback on the user’s reaction to the prototype.

WHEN

When a complex idea needs to be quickly tested.

WHY

To test a promising idea that is complicated or time consuming to prototype.

NOTE!

Make sure that the prototype is clear
and easy to follow by different users and/or stakeholders. Usually high production yields better results.

OUTPUT

A video prototype of an idea and feedback on what works and what doesn’t.

Next

Consider if the idea works, if it needs to be polished or if it needs to be trashed.

Reference

MACKAY, Wendy E.; FAYARD, Anne Laure. Video brainstorming and prototyping: techniques for participatory design. In: CHI'99 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems. ACM, 1999. p. 118-119./
YOUNG, Emilie; GREENLEE, Russell. Participatory video prototyping. In:Posters and Short Talks of the 1992 SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, 1992. p. 28-28./

Video prototyping

1 DAY - 2 WEEKS

Video prototyping is a simple way to show new and speculative designs, ideas, scenarios, futures or products. Showing a video gives you a clear idea of how users might perceive a concept that might be difficult to prototype otherwise.

TASKS

1. Select a concept to prototype, Split the concept into steps that need to be shown and explained.
2. Write a script that clearly explains all the steps of the solution and how they work within the desired context.
3. Create a storyboard based on the script.
4. Organize everything that is needed to proceed for filming (actors, cameras, permits, etc.)
5. Film according to your plan and schedule.
6. Develop special graphics and/or special effects if needed.
7. Edit all the clips into a consistent story and render it.
8. Recruit and gather potential users of the design, show them the video.
9. Collect notes and feedback on the user’s reaction to the prototype.

WHEN

When a complex idea needs to be quickly tested.

WHY

To test a promising idea that is complicated or time consuming to prototype.

NOTE!

Make sure that the prototype is clear
and easy to follow by different users and/or stakeholders. Usually high production yields better results.

OUTPUT

A video prototype of an idea and feedback on what works and what doesn’t.

Next

Consider if the idea works, if it needs to be polished or if it needs to be trashed.

Reference

MACKAY, Wendy E.; FAYARD, Anne Laure. Video brainstorming and prototyping: techniques for participatory design. In: CHI'99 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems. ACM, 1999. p. 118-119./
YOUNG, Emilie; GREENLEE, Russell. Participatory video prototyping. In:Posters and Short Talks of the 1992 SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, 1992. p. 28-28./