Storyboard

Storyboard is a narrative tool derived from cinema. It’s a form of prototyping which communicates each step of an activity, experience, interaction or event.

Storyboard

2 HOURS - 1 DAY

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TASKS

1. Decide on a story/interaction/experience you want to communicate. Make the message very clear.
2. Write/draw the global storyline. Think of the steps of the story and how to communicate them in images. Make sure you convey all the important information in a simple but complete and intelligible way.
3. Start drawing a quick sketch, then start refining it (storywise).
4. To make sure that every important step is clear for the reader. Go over the drawings with someone who is unfamiliar with the story, ask feedback and add short (text) explanations where needed.
5. Present the storyboard to stakeholders. Make notes of the feedback received.

RESOURCES

WHEN

After ideation, and when you want to see how users experience your design.

WHY

Storyboards allow to display an entire story and get feedback on specific stages of an experience.

NOTE!

Not everyone is an artist, it’s alright if the sketches aren’t beautiful. Its alright to mess up and start over.

OUTPUT

A storyline of an event, interaction, activity or experience that can be presented.

Next

Do a lo-fi prototype of the concept and test it.

Reference

ANDRIOLE, Stephen J. Storyboard prototyping: a new approach to user requirements analysis. QED Information Sciences, Inc., 1989. VAN DER LELIE, Corrie. The value of storyboards in the product design process. Personal and ubiquitous computing, 2006, 10.2-3: 159-162.

Storyboard

2 HOURS - 1 DAY

Storyboard is a narrative tool derived from cinema. It’s a form of prototyping which communicates each step of an activity, experience, interaction or event.

TASKS

1. Decide on a story/interaction/experience you want to communicate. Make the message very clear.
2. Write/draw the global storyline. Think of the steps of the story and how to communicate them in images. Make sure you convey all the important information in a simple but complete and intelligible way.
3. Start drawing a quick sketch, then start refining it (storywise).
4. To make sure that every important step is clear for the reader. Go over the drawings with someone who is unfamiliar with the story, ask feedback and add short (text) explanations where needed.
5. Present the storyboard to stakeholders. Make notes of the feedback received.

WHEN

After ideation, and when you want to see how users experience your design.

WHY

Storyboards allow to display an entire story and get feedback on specific stages of an experience.

NOTE!

Not everyone is an artist, it’s alright if the sketches aren’t beautiful. Its alright to mess up and start over.

OUTPUT

A storyline of an event, interaction, activity or experience that can be presented.

Next

Do a lo-fi prototype of the concept and test it.

Reference

ANDRIOLE, Stephen J. Storyboard prototyping: a new approach to user requirements analysis. QED Information Sciences, Inc., 1989. VAN DER LELIE, Corrie. The value of storyboards in the product design process. Personal and ubiquitous computing, 2006, 10.2-3: 159-162.