1-on-1 interview

A one-on-one interview is a conversation between a researcher and a participant in a face-to-face situation.

1-on-1 interview

4 HOURS - 1 DAY

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TASKS

1. Specify the goal of the interview and select questions and subjects around the topic carefully.
2. Define if there is a need for a structured interview or semi-structured interview. Structured interviews have a clear guide that needs to be followed, semi-structured interviews allow for flexibility within the interview.
3. Conduct a pre-interview during the recruitment phase, to refine the guide.
4. Talk, watch, listen and observe as you conduct the interview.
5. Document the interview by recording audio/video (if possible) and take notes.
6. Analyze and compare the information gathered from the interview(s).

WHEN

When there is a need for information from users and/or experts.

WHY

Facilitates quick and early discovery; best for personal information; works well in combination with other methods.

NOTE!

For structured interviews, the interviewer should be consistent across interviews.

OUTPUT

Notes and recordings of the interviews.

Next

Analyse recordings to uncover insights and identify possible ways to incorporate them into a solution.

Reference

RUBIN, Herbert J.; RUBIN, Irene S. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. Sage publications, 2012./ RUBIN, Herbert J.; RUBIN, Irene S. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. Sage, 2011./

1-on-1 interview

4 HOURS - 1 DAY

A one-on-one interview is a conversation between a researcher and a participant in a face-to-face situation.

TASKS

1. Specify the goal of the interview and select questions and subjects around the topic carefully.
2. Define if there is a need for a structured interview or semi-structured interview. Structured interviews have a clear guide that needs to be followed, semi-structured interviews allow for flexibility within the interview.
3. Conduct a pre-interview during the recruitment phase, to refine the guide.
4. Talk, watch, listen and observe as you conduct the interview.
5. Document the interview by recording audio/video (if possible) and take notes.
6. Analyze and compare the information gathered from the interview(s).

WHEN

When there is a need for information from users and/or experts.

WHY

Facilitates quick and early discovery; best for personal information; works well in combination with other methods.

NOTE!

For structured interviews, the interviewer should be consistent across interviews.

OUTPUT

Notes and recordings of the interviews.

Next

Analyse recordings to uncover insights and identify possible ways to incorporate them into a solution.

Reference

RUBIN, Herbert J.; RUBIN, Irene S. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. Sage publications, 2012./ RUBIN, Herbert J.; RUBIN, Irene S. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. Sage, 2011./